AACP Forum @ APP 2019 Competencies and Learning Objectives

Accreditation Information and Competencies

Accreditation Number: A1903AACP1

This activity has been accredited for 5.75 hrs of Group 1 CPD (or 5.75 CPD credits) suitable for inclusion in an individual pharmacist’s CPD plan which can be converted to 5.75 hrs of Group 2 CPD (or 11.5 Group 2 CPD credits) upon successful completion of relevant assessment activities.

The 2016 Competency Standards addressed by this activity include: 1.1, 1.4, 1.5, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 3.4, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.5, 3.6

Learning Objectives

The National Pain Strategy-The Role of Pharmacy

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of pain in Australia
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the main features of Australia’s National Pain Strategy and National Strategic Action Plan for Pain Management
  • Identify concerning trends relating to the use of opioids in Australia
  • Identify the benefits of an interdisciplinary approach to pain assessment and management

Understanding the Chronic Pain MedsCheck Trial

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Discuss the objectives of a Chronic Pain MedsCheck
  • Identify concepts of patient activation, validation and catastrophising in patient conversations
  • Interpret responses to common pain assessment tools
  • Apply patient-centred approach to pain management during medication reviews

Starting the patient conversation: Analgesics, Pain and Deprescribing   

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Discuss aspects of patient-centred communication skills and the importance of emotional response
  • Describe the socio-psycho-bio-medical model of pain and the role of thalamus in pain modulation
  • Discuss the role of opioids in acute and persistent pain management
  • Discuss the poor correlation between imaging findings and pain

Pain management in Osteoarthritis- The new RACGP Guidelines (2018)

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Describe the factors associated with pain and structural deterioration in patients with symptomatic osteoarthritis.
  • Select individualised treatment plans for patients with osteoarthritis, including consideration of drug and non-pharmacological treatment options.
  • Discuss the relative magnitude of treatment related benefits and the quality of the supporting evidence base.

Treating older adults with persistent pain in the age of opioid scrutiny

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Develop an appreciation of the epidemiology of pain problems in the older population
  • Recognise the importance of multi-disciplinary management of persistent pain in the older adult
  • Review the pharmacokinetic changes in the older person and their potential impact on pain management
  • Develop an appreciation of the difficulties of managing pain in the cognitively impaired patient

Making an accurate pain assessment-the importance of good history taking

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Differentiate the pain measurement tools to assess and help manage patients with chronic pain
  • Use appropriate communication techniques to conduct an effective pain assessment
  • Identify red and yellow flags for early identification and intervention

Neuroplasticity and Chronic Pain

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Recognise that neuroplasticity is a natural phenomenon with implications throughout life.
  • Recognise that neuroplasticity is more than academic and a work in process.
  • Discuss the importance of neuroplasticity in clinical practice, use of current therapies and designing future treatments.
  • Describe the implications of neuroplasticity to clinical practice – appropriate tests, choice of treatments and challenges managing acute, acute to chronic and chronic pain.
  • Anticipate treating a constantly adapting nervous system and recognise that chronic pain is multifactorial and requires a multidisciplinary approach.

Managing the Pain of Opioids-Promoting de-escalation post hospital admission

 After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Describe the concept and aims of Opioid Stewardship
  • Recognise the risk factors for long-term opioid use or misuse in previously opioid-naïve patients
  • Identify opportunities for the de-escalation of a patients’ opioid medications

Principles and practice of opioid rotation/switching

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Describe the clinical features inherent in opioid rotation.
  • Discuss aspects of opioid pharmacology relevant when considering opioid rotation

CGRP: A new era for migraine treatment

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Review the underlying pathophysiology and etiology of migraine
  • Examine the current therapeutic targets for treatment and prevention of migraine
  • Describe the place of CGRP receptor antagonists in migraine treatment

Strategies for GP Communication and Patient tips

After completing this activity, pharmacists should be able to:

  • Explain the 3 components of conversational competence 
  • Identify statements which show validation and empathy to patients living with persistent pain
  • Explain the key elements of a patient assessment when reporting to a GP